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Wednesday, January 17, 2018

LESSON 9: Serve with Humility and Experience God’s Presence

Welcome to Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Reid Lehman is our guest blogger this week for the second of three lessons in "Part 3: Nominees for the Board Member Hall of Fame.”

LESSON 9 OF 40 - Serve with Humility and Experience God’s Presence
One board chair creates a holy moment for his CEO Search Committee.

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK:
 In Lesson 9, we’re reminded of the critical importance of humility, both as a follower of Jesus Christ and in board and CEO leadership.  

Read how an applicant for a rescue mission CEO position focused on humility in his job application, when most applicants would have focused on building their brand. A top book that new CEO asked his staff team to read was Humility, by Andrew Murray.

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 9, pages 44-47: 
 Humility, by Andrew Murray, is a dangerous book and an important one. God is constantly seeking for the humble who will surrender their will and life to him.   
• The search committee used spiritual discernment over ordinary decision-making in selecting their new CEO and one member said a year later, “I will go to my grave remembering that holy moment as one of the top spiritual experiences of my life.”
• General Norman Schwarzkopf: “Leaders need two things—character and strategy.  If you can do only one, drop strategy.” 

MY COLOR COMMENTARY:
This chapter inspired me to read Murray’s book. It’s powerful!  
   • Humility before people is the only real proof that our humility before God is more than just a figment of our imagination.  
   • The energy behind all spiritual growth . . . comes from a conviction that all we have comes from God.  
   • Let’s look at difficult people as God’s instrument for our purification.
   • The humility that brings a man or a woman to the point of being nothing before God at the same time removes every obstacle to faith.

Board leadership is a “group sport.” If we believe that God imparts wisdom by his spirit in a multitude of counselors, then we’ll come to board meetings more intent on hearing God’s voice in the group—than on pushing our point of view.   

My most fulfilling board meetings (both while serving as a board member and as a CEO) have come when no one pushed his/her agenda. All of us humbly sought God’s opinion, and His voice was made clear as those present shared what they heard from Him. When your board knows it has heard God’s voice, board members will have joy and confidence in the decision.  

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY REID LEHMAN:












Reid Lehman has served for more than 30 years as the CEO of Miracle Hill Ministries, a comprehensive ministry of rescue missions, addiction recovery centers, children’s homes, and foster care families caring for more than 650 children, women and men in South Carolina.  A Policy Governance® trainer/facilitator, Reid chairs the governance committee of the Together SC board, and serves as a governance coach with the Association of Gospel Rescue Missions, training boards of rescue missions across the country.  He is the author of two books: God Wears His Own Watch and Are Those the Words You Meant to Use? His favorite books include, Pursuing God’s Will Together, by Ruth Haley Barton, and Celebration of Discipline, by Richard Foster.  

TO-DO TODAY: 
• Download Humility, by Andrew Murray (only 59 pages long, it’s in the public domain). Consider reading it in your devotions this week.  
• Answer the question, “How would you approach your board discussions and your board or CEO role differently if you were practicing true humility and listening for God’s voice?”
  



NEXT WEDNESDAY:

On Jan. 24, 2018, watch for Jeff Lilley's commentary on Lesson 10, "Prioritize Prayer Over Problems: Create space for prayer--serious supplications for a serious work."

Subscribe to this blog by submitting your email (just above the date/day). Visit the Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom webpage and order extra 
copies for your board members.




Wednesday, January 10, 2018

LESSON 8: Listen to the Wisdom of Many Counselors

Welcome to Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Wayne Pederson is our guest blogger this week for the first of three lessons in "Part 3: Nominees for the Board Member Hall of Fame.”

LESSON 8 OF 40 - Listen to the Wisdom of Many Counselors
Don't ask board members to vote against God!

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK:
 In Lesson 8, we learn the importance of a leader’s ability to listen to the counsel of others.  Yes, leaders are supposed to lead and produce a great strategy, hopefully from the Lord. However, the greatest leadership skill is not speaking. The greatest leadership skill is learning to listen.  We as leaders must lead in a way that invites wise counsel from others, especially our board.  

Ideas, plans and strategies must be clearly and compellingly presented to the board, in a way that allows board members to discuss, discern, possibly dissect, then decide.

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 8, pages 40-43: 
 “The board wants you to lead, but it’s their job to define the parameters.”
• There is wisdom in many counselors. (Proverbs 15:22)
• “Listen, listen, listen.”

MY COLOR COMMENTARY:
You’ve heard: God gave us two ears and one mouth. So we need to listen more than we speak. More wisely, James, the brother of Jesus, said: “Be quick to listen, slow to speak.”

I’m not, by nature, a good listener. I have to work at concentrating on the one who is speaking. I’ve been embarrassed at times when I’ve mentally checked out of a discussion, only to be called on to respond.

This is not good if you, as a leader, are accountable to a board. Good leaders take wise counsel. They pay careful attention to the advice of others and will process thoughtfully what is being said. 

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY WAYNE PEDERSON:













WAYNE PEDERSON has served his entire career in Christian broadcasting, leading radio ministries at University of Northwestern, Moody Broadcasting, and most recently Reach Beyond (formerly HCJB). He’s held leadership positions in National Religious Broadcasters and Mission America Coalition. He recently stepped aside as president/CEO of Reach Beyond. He likes to say he has moved from management to leadership; and now from leadership to influence. He currently serves on the board of NRB, The Joshua Fund, and ECFA. 


TO-DO TODAY: 
• As leader: Make an intentional commitment to listen to the words of others.
As board member: Resist distractions. Focus on the discussion and issues that impact the ongoing effectiveness of the organization. 
  



NEXT WEDNESDAY:

On Jan. 17, 2018, watch for Reid Lehman's commentary on Lesson 9, "Serve With Humility and Experience God's Presence. One board chair creates a holy moment for his CEO search committee."

Subscribe to this blog by submitting your email (just above the date/day). Visit the Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom webpage and order extra 
copies for your board members.




Wednesday, January 3, 2018

LESSON 7: Typos Matter!

Welcome to Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Jim Galvin is our guest blogger this week for the fourth of four lessons in "Part 2: Boardroom Tools, Templates, and Typos."

LESSON 7 OF 40 - Typos Matter!
“Pious shoddy is still shoddy.”

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK:
 In Lesson 7, we are reminded that proofreading matters. It doesn’t have to take that long and it doesn’t have to cost anything. Often, someone already on your team is an effective proofreader.

We also learn about the value of using a proven stylebook together with a stylesheet developed just for your organization. The stylesheet will save more time than it takes to develop it.

Simply put—board documents, minutes, and policy manuals filled with typos make you and the organization look bad.

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 7, pages 33-37: 
 “Graciously, my board chair said nothing about the typos that ricocheted across every page.”
• John Wesley: “'Our responsibility is to give the world the right impression of God.’ Well-proofed board materials help you do that!”
• Prayer: “Lord, thank you for publishers who give us your Holy Bible without typos!” 

MY COLOR COMMENTARY:
There is a certain sense of hollow victory in finding a typo in a professionally published book or a newspaper like USA Today. None of your friends will really care, yet it does reflect poorly on the publisher, especially if the typos are frequent.

Chapter 7 did a good job at explaining why proofreading is impotent. I will focus on the how. Typos make the board and organization look ignernt.

Use spell check. Today’s word processing programs have robust spell checking and grammar features that automatically correct typos. But sometimes they substitute a wrong word and unintentionally introduce errors. They also may have difficulty distinguishing between words like for, four, and fore. At any rate, ignoring the squiggly red lines underneath words in your document is stoopid.

Get fresh eyes. After your writing and editing is complete, find one or two people with a gift for finding typos and ask them to proof it. “Intuitive” people tend to do worse than “Sensing” personalities at this. You can find out more by looking up the Briggs and Stratton Personality Type Indicator.

Normally, I would ask my wife to do a read-through for me on a proposal to a client or a guest blog post, but no time today.

Gym Galvin

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY JIM GALVIN:













James C. Galvin, Ed.D. is an organizational consultant and facilitator specializing in strategy, board governance, and leadership development. As an author, Jim has been published by Zondervan, Tyndale House, Thomas Nelson, Baker, NavPress, Moody Press, and InterVarsity Press. He is also the co-creator and senior editor of the best-selling Life Application Study Bible. Jim’s most recent book is I’ve Got Your Back, a leadership parable with a compelling story that delivers a concise theology of leadership and followership. He is also the managing partner of the Alliance for Board Effectiveness.


TO-DO TODAY: 
• Identify the people around you who have a gift for detailed work and ask for their help.
• For bigger projects, locate one or two professional proofreaders looking for new clients.
• Never attempt to proofread your own writing. 
  



NEXT WEDNESDAY:

On Jan. 10, 2018, watch for Wayne Pederson's commentary on Lesson 8, "Listen to the Wisdom of Many Counselors. Don't ask board members to vote against God!

Subscribe to this blog by submitting your email (just above the date/day). Visit the Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom webpage and order extra 
copies for your board members.




Wednesday, December 27, 2017

LESSON 6: Eliminate Hallway Whining

Welcome to Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Rev. Patrick Clements is our guest blogger this week for the third of four lessons in "Part 2: Boardroom Tools, Templates, and Typos."

LESSON 6 OF 40 - Eliminate Hallway Whining
The 5/15 report to the board takes just five minutes to read and 15 minutes to write.

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK:
 In Lesson 6, we look at the needs for every effective CEO to “Eliminate Hallway Whining.” It is interesting that every survey I’ve seen, that measures a board member’s satisfaction with board service, has reported lower scores for the CEO’s communication—than for other factors. So the CEO’s knee jerk reaction is to simply send more reports. This too is a potential problem. Great board members are generally very busy men and women. What a dilemma for the executive! How do I hit the sweet spot? What is the holy grail of effective communication?

CEOs worth their salt want to have open, transparent and effective communication with their boards. My answer is to gain agreement that the board will accept a monthly report that can easily be read in five minutes (and takes the CEO just 15 minutes to write). I have found the best tool is what has come to be called the 5/15 Report. The rule of thumb for the report—less is more. You want to give full information in a quick, easy-to-read format. 

If I am really honest as a CEO, the motivations for this are fully selfish. First, I know in my core that the board will respond best if they have confidence that they are informed. Providing no surprises is a great way to work with a board. Secondly, as a busy executive I don’t have time to labor over a monthly report. I need a template that gives the information without burdening either the board or me. Voila! Problem solved with a well-structured 5/15 Report.

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 6, pages 26-32: 
 The board of directors can tend to lose confidence, or whine as the book posits, if they feel out of the loop.
• As in life, communication is a vital key in the care and feeding of board relationships.
• The 5/15 Report is a tool that has stood the test of time. No matter what generation of leaders you are working with, you will find that effective, time sensitive, and transparent communication works.
• It is very important to consider the key elements that you include in your version of the 5/15 Report. Not all boards or nonprofits are the same. Be sure that you keep the goal in mind—less is more. 

MY COLOR COMMENTARY:
I have had the wonderful privilege of serving on a number of nonprofit boards, and chairing several of them. Those opportunities to serve proved to be great educational moments for me. Without fail I found that the successful and respected CEOs were outstanding communicators. Not all the CEOs were dynamic, charismatic men or women, but all the great ones were transparent and effective communicators. 

Truth be known—if we approach the opportunities of service as lifelong learners—we will find insights that will serve us well over time. I believe that the 5/15 Report concept is a good answer. It was developed out of a random conversation with mentor and friend Ted Engstrom, then president of World Vision. We didn’t have a name for the report when we talked. Soon after that conversation, the 5/15 Report became a regular part of my reporting regimen with the board I served as CEO. It proved to be a tremendous tool which has now been used successfully by many.

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY REV. PATRICK CLEMENTS:





Rev. Patrick Clements is the recently retired president of Church Extension Plan where he served for 34 years. CEP, a ministry affiliated with the Assemblies of God, makes loans to churches and ministries to build buildings. It is also a place where individuals and organizations invest in a note program which provides the resources for the loans. CEP’s total asset base is over $500 million. Clements has authored two books: Proven Concepts of Church Building and Finance and Financial Freedom: More Than Being Debt Free—Tools for Managing Your Personal Finances. He has served on eight nonprofit boards and has chaired three of them. Pat, and his wife Connie, have four sons and 12 grandchildren.

TO-DO TODAY: 
• Spend some time thinking about what should be included in your version of the 5/15 Report.
• Review your draft 5/15 Report, and the concept, with your board chairperson and gain agreement with the new communication tool.  
  



NEXT WEDNESDAY:

On Jan. 3, 2018, watch for Jim Galvin's commentary on Lesson 7, "Typos Matter! Pious shoddy is still shoddy."

Subscribe to this blog by submitting your email (just above the date/day). Visit the Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom webpage and order extra 
copies for your board members.




Wednesday, December 20, 2017

LESSON 5 - Before the Board Meeting

Welcome to Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Ed McDowell is our guest blogger this week for the second of four lessons in "Part 2: Boardroom Tools, Templates, and Typos."


LESSON 5 OF 40 - Before the Board Meeting
Collaborate, then wisely build the board meeting agenda.

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK:
 In Lesson 5, the underlying truth is that intentional and timely planning and collaboration between the board chair and CEO positions the board for maximum effectiveness. 

The better the collaboration and planning, the healthier the governance process and outcomes will be. As chair and CEO, think it through ahead of time. Give staff, task forces, and committees plenty of time to be prepared by making an agenda available with enough lead time.  

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 5, pages 21-25: 
 “Allow for reconnection” has great value.  Remember the board is a spiritual community gathered to govern a piece of God’s Kingdom. Connection with each other is a high priority.  
“Provide time for heavy lifting” is an important concept in agenda planning. Make sure the most important discussion and issues on the agenda get the best time and energy of the board meeting. 
“…bathe the agenda in prayer to allow the Holy Spirit to guide the board members during the meeting.” The agenda is the board chair’s and CEO’s discerning process for aligning with God, His purposes, His will.  Spend time in prayer that prepares the entire board for alignment with God and His intentions for the ministry.  

While a board agenda may seem mundane, it is the planning platform for Kingdom-based governance results. 

MY COLOR COMMENTARY:
I currently serve in both the role of CEO and board chair for different ministries. Here’s what I have found—if the relationship between the two cultivates trust, it creates a conduit for effective planning and results.  

In preparing a good agenda, it is good for the CEO to bring to the board chair any updates on action items from previous meetings. Generative thinking together can also aid in the planning of a good agenda.  

Underlying this foundational collaboration is a relationship of mutual trust and spiritual integrity. It is the foundation on which good planning is built.

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY ED McDOWELL:





Ed McDowell is the CEO of Warm Beach Camp and Conference Center in Stanwood, Wash.  He also leads Thriving Boards, a board coaching initiative of the Christian Camp and Conference Association. Ed also does consulting with a special focus on board development and problem-solving with fresh perspectives. He and his wife, Bev, live in Stanwood, Wash., where they enjoy their family. 

TO-DO TODAY: 
• Do a one-question survey of the board via email:  On a scale of 1-5 (5 is very effective), “How effectively did we use your time in the recent board meeting?”
• Set up a planning session between the board chair and CEO regarding the agenda for the next board meeting.  
  



NEXT WEDNESDAY:

On Dec. 27, 2017, watch for Pat Clement's commentary on Lesson 6, "Eliminate Hallway Whining. The 5/15 report to the board takes just five minutes to read and 15 minutes to write."

Subscribe to this blog by submitting your email (just above the date/day). Visit the Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom webpage and order extra 
copies for your board members.




Wednesday, December 13, 2017

LESSON 4 - Do Unwritten Board Policies Really Exist?

Welcome to Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Bob Andringa is our guest blogger this week for the first of four lessons in "Part 2: Boardroom Tools, Templates, and Typos."

LESSON 4 OF 40 - Do Unwritten Board Policies Really Exist?
Can't find that 10-year-old policy? You need a BPM.

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK:
 In Lesson 4, John and Dan point us to the best “governance operating system” for ministry boards, large or small—a Board Policies Manual (BPM). 

A BPM contains (a) ALL the on-going policies a board needs to address, (b) in ONE organized document (maybe 20 pages with some attachments), (c) that is reviewed at every board meeting based on new data and new wisdom from the Lord.  Who on a board can remember all the “policies” contained in years of minutes?!  

A BPM solves many common issues that make boards dysfunctional.  Once you have one, and keep it current, you will never convene board meetings without it.

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 4, pages 14-20: 
This chapter affirmed my 23-year love affair with a BPM and I am grateful for its reference to one of my own books. Lesson 4 prompted so many good insights as to the WHY and the HOW of starting and maintaining a BPM.  These are key:  

• Since no one rereads minutes after a few years, policies still relevant in a court of law get lost in the files.  Besides, old ad hoc motions in the minutes often conflict with one another and don’t make sense for guiding future decisions.
The oral tradition doesn’t and should not work for boards that take governance seriously.   
• An up-to-date, organized BPM serves many purposes. It allows a new board member or new CEO to get up to speed fast; saves time by not rehashing issues already addressed in the BPM; helps the board stay focused on what it must do (governance) rather than what it may be tempted to do (management).
• A small board committee might be the best way to draft a first BPM for board review (but the CEO might be an alternative drafter).  

MY COLOR COMMENTARY:
Really, any organization that wants governance to be more than mediocre needs a BPM.  The original concept came in a 1994 book by John Carver. He was gracious enough to allow my co-author, Fred Laughlin, and me to write Good Governance for Nonprofits: Developing Principles and Policies for an Effective Board.

For every hour spent on creating and maintaining a Board Policies Manual, at least three hours of board and committee meetings will be saved before too long. It’s a “living document,” always reflecting the latest wisdom of the board.

No BPM—even when amended several times a year—reflects perfection. But it does help in recruiting new board members and CEOs. It builds trust between the board and CEO because they are working off the same song sheet. It saves time because well-crafted policies allow decisions to be made in accordance with the BPM between board meetings. Showing a BPM to major donors or foundations gives them confidence your ministry is well led.  

Like the Rich Stearns quote on page 14 of Lessons, you can enjoy a long governance honeymoon as a CEO or board member by creating your own BPM. Why wait? Hundreds (perhaps thousands now) of ministries are moving from good to great with their customized BPM. A good BPM contains dozens of best practices. For a free downloadable primer on the What, Why and How of a BPM, visit The Andringa Group website and download “Introduction to Board Policies Manual” and get started.

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY BOB ANDRINGA:

Dr. Bob Andringa is active in “re-firement” after a diverse career that included: university administrator, military officer, congressional committee staff director, gubernatorial campaign manager, director of policy research for that successful governor in Minnesota, CEO of the Education Commission of the States and the Council for Christian Colleges & Universities, and a governance consultant to more than 400 faith-based nonprofit CEOs and their boards. Bob and his wife, Sue, live in Scottsdale, Ariz., and have two grown sons. 

TO-DO TODAY: 
• Read Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, then may I (humbly) suggest you read my book, Good Governance for Nonprofits.  
Click here to download an updated BPM template you can customize for your board.
  



NEXT WEDNESDAY:

On Dec. 20, 2017, watch for Ed McDowell's color commentary on Lesson 5, "Before the Board Meeting - Collaborate, then wisely build the board meeting agenda."

Subscribe to this blog by submitting your email (just above the date/day). Visit the Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom webpage and order extra 
copies for your board members.




Wednesday, December 6, 2017

LESSON 3 - Assess Your Boardroom Demeanor and Engagement

Welcome to Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom Blog, a 40-week journey through the new book, Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom, by Dan Busby and John Pearson. Each Wednesday, we're featuring a guest writer’s favorite snippet from the week's topic. Kim Triller is our guest blogger this week.

LESSON 3 OF 40 - Assess Your Boardroom Demeanor and Engagement
Does anybody need to make amends?

THE BIG IDEA FROM THE BOOK:
 In Lesson 3, we learn that true Christ-focused board governance involves:
• Humbling one’s heart with specific requests for God’s guidance at the onset of a meeting.
• Earnestly listening for God’s voice and the Holy Spirit’s nudge throughout the meeting and then heeding the nudge by appropriate action.
• Being mindful to conclude the meeting with opportunity to ensure unity in participation and relationships among the board members.  

Using examples from Bill Hybels’ book, The Power of a Whisper: Hearing God. Having the Guts to Respond., the importance of responding to prompts from the Holy Spirit while serving as leaders in God’s ministry is well explained. The work of governance can then be approached with a proper mindset and with strength in what the Lord can do. It is no longer “just a board meeting,” it is a God-ordained invitation to enter in the process of fulfilling His vision through your ministry. This reality keeps board members attentive to maintaining unity, clarity, and proper engagement.

MY FAVORITE INSIGHTS from Lesson 3, pages 10-12: 
Prayer: “Lord help me to speak thoughtfully and cautiously. And when I don’t, may grace abound. May we have Your mind on the matters we discuss. Amen.” 
• Referencing James 1:5 (“If any of you lacks wisdom…”), Bill Hybels comments, “The challenge isn’t whether or not He will send it [wisdom], but whether or not we will hear and heed it.”
• Dan Bolin: “Help me voice my opinion with care, strength, and meekness.  Help me to say nothing degrading and nothing that would draw lines of conflict unnecessarily.”

Imagine what progress can be made when mindful prayers like these are purposefully prayed: the Lord responds throughout the meeting by making His will known, leaders perceive it, and leaders take the necessary action to make it happen. When God actively participates in the process—and board members actively listen and respond accordingly—unity should naturally flow. 

MY COLOR COMMENTARY:
I have had the opportunity to observe Christian non-profit boards at work. It is not uncommon to watch meetings where the board opens in prayer and proceeds to go step-by-step through the meeting or retreat agenda. They do the work of discussion, decision-making, and vision casting—followed by drafting a plan. Then, at the end of their time together, they pray and ask the Lord to bless the plans they have made or the policies they have adopted.  

“God-given visions are always impossible to achieve apart from God,” note Richard and Henry Blackaby in their book, Spiritual Leadership: Moving People on to God's Agenda

The preeminent  theme in Lesson 3 is the acknowledgment of the board’s participatory role in God’s ministry through leadership. It is God’s plan for the ministry (not their own) that the board aspires to discern. He is present in every meeting and is a willing participant in the decisions being made.  

When boards, through earnest prayer, ask God to give them His mind on matters they are discussing, they can more easily discern God’s voice and live out the plan He has made for them. This should give the board more confidence in their actions on behalf of the ministry, more faith in the future for the ministry, and more joy in participating in work that is so close to the Lord’s heart. 

The Board Action Steps at the end of this chapter can help board members change their board meeting mindset to a more Christ-focused one. This also helps members approach governance with healthy expectations and better understanding that each person called to serve on that board has a special purpose in that calling.  Prayer and working in unity—while acting on the nudges from the Holy Spirit—will protect the ministry and further the mission. 

THIS WEEK’S QUOTES & COMMENTARY BY KIM TRILLER:


Kim Triller is Executive Director of Care Net Pregnancy & Family Services of Puget Sound in Washington State. Care Net of Puget Sound currently has seven Medical/Family Services Centers, a Mobile Medical Unit serving in Seattle, and additional community outreach programs and services that have met the needs of over 250,000 individuals since its inception in 1982.  Kim also serves as an approved trainer for Care Net National and in 2017 as a board coach in the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Board Leadership & Development Program. 

TO-DO TODAY: 
Assess your board meeting agenda and regular board meeting practices. Are you ensuring that participation is given by all board members in a manner that respects the individual speaking and promotes unity in action?
• Ask each board member to choose one of the Board Action Steps on page 12 and complete it for the next meeting. 




NEXT WEDNESDAY:

On Dec. 13, 2017, watch for Bob Andringa's color commentary on Lesson 4, “Do Unwritten Board Policies Really Exist? Can't find that 10-year-old policy? You need a BPM."

Subscribe to this blog by submitting your email (just above the date/day). Visit the Lessons From the Nonprofit Boardroom webpage and order extra 
copies for your board members.